April 26, 2004: Headlines: Vietnam: The Bristol Press: "These are people who at an important point in their lives were intensely involved with Vietnam. I think itís a matter of people being engaged at an important point in their life, and feeling thereís something incomplete about the U.S. relationship," said John McAuliffe, a Peace Corps volunteer and anti-Vietnam War activist whose younger brother fought in Vietnam.

Peace Corps Online: Peace Corps News: Headlines: April 2004 Peace Corps Headlines: April 26, 2004: Headlines: Vietnam: The Bristol Press: "These are people who at an important point in their lives were intensely involved with Vietnam. I think itís a matter of people being engaged at an important point in their life, and feeling thereís something incomplete about the U.S. relationship," said John McAuliffe, a Peace Corps volunteer and anti-Vietnam War activist whose younger brother fought in Vietnam.

By Admin1 (admin) (151.196.45.115) on Wednesday, June 09, 2004 - 4:54 pm: Edit Post

"These are people who at an important point in their lives were intensely involved with Vietnam. I think itís a matter of people being engaged at an important point in their life, and feeling thereís something incomplete about the U.S. relationship," said John McAuliffe, a Peace Corps volunteer and anti-Vietnam War activist whose younger brother fought in Vietnam.

These are people who at an important point in their lives were intensely involved with Vietnam. I think itís a matter of people being engaged at an important point in their life, and feeling thereís something incomplete about the U.S. relationship, said John McAuliffe, a Peace Corps volunteer and anti-Vietnam War activist whose younger brother fought in Vietnam.

"These are people who at an important point in their lives were intensely involved with Vietnam. I think itís a matter of people being engaged at an important point in their life, and feeling thereís something incomplete about the U.S. relationship," said John McAuliffe, a Peace Corps volunteer and anti-Vietnam War activist whose younger brother fought in Vietnam.

Members of Congress work to tie loose ends in Vietnam

By JOSEPH STRAW , Special to The Bristol Press

04/26/2004
WASHINGTON -- U.S. relations with Vietnam, which have improved by leaps and bounds over the past decade, will take another step forward this week when members of Congress announce formation of the U.S.-Vietnam Caucus.

As has often been the case, itís legislators who spent part of their early adulthood fighting in Vietnam who are now offering their hands: U.S. Reps. Rob Simmons, R-2nd District, and Lane Evans, D-Ill.

Evans served during the war in Vietnam with the Marine Corps, while Simmons spent 14 years as a cold warrior, first in the Army during the war, then for a decade in the Central Intelligence Agency, including service in Southeast Asia.

Simmons and Evans are scheduled to make their announcement Wednesday at the Capitol, where they will be joined by Vietnamese Ambassador to the U.S. Nguyen Tam Chien, and Nguyen Phuc Thanh, vice president of the National Assembly of Vietnam.

An aide said Simmonsí interest in relations with Vietnam was sparked during a trip back to the country last April. Simmons met with government officials in an effort to locate the remains of Army Capt. Arnold Holm, a Waterford, Conn., native whose helicopter was shot down over Vietnam in 1972.

Evans has been active in the 13-year-old collaboration between the United States and Vietnam to determine the fates of U.S. prisoners of war and service members missing in action. He also pushed for registration and support of U.S. veterans suffering health effects of Agent Orange exposure in Vietnam.

Former U.S. Sen. Bob Kerrey, R-Neb., a former Navy SEAL awarded the Medal of Honor for service in Vietnam, was among the leading advocates for normalization of relations between the two countries during the 1990s.

 Vietnam

John McAuliffe, who 19 years ago founded the U.S.-Indochina Reconciliation Project, now called the Fund for Reconciliation and Develop-ment, said thereís "nothing mysterious" about U.S. legislatorsí interest in reconciling with a government they once fought.

"These are people who at an important point in their lives were intensely involved with Vietnam. I think itís a matter of people being engaged at an important point in their life, and feeling thereís something incomplete about the U.S. relationship," said McAuliffe, a Peace Corps volunteer and anti-Vietnam War activist whose younger brother fought in Vietnam.


In 1992 then-President Bush allowed American businesses to begin operations in Vietnam. Three years later, President Clinton lifted a trade embargo with the country. Now the United States is the leading foreign investor in Vietnam, and Americans represent the second-largest segment of tourists who visit the country, behind the Chinese.

Officials said the caucus will work to "strengthen ties between our two people and governments in the areas of trade and economy" and support "the joint effort to recover and repatriate the remains of our missing service members."

Simmons called the caucus "a positive step towards building a strong relationship between our nations."


©The Bristol Press 2004



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Story Source: The Bristol Press

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PCOL11572
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By marek zielinski (212.2.2.86) on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 - 2:27 pm: Edit Post

"Nothing that I can do will change the structure of the universe.
But maybe, by raising my voice I can help the greatest of all causes -
goodwill among men and peace on earth."
Albert Einstein

Friends,
Let us introduce ourselves to all already active in the process of promoting peace by inviting you to view our web page www.peace365.org in which we point out to the invitation received from the United Nation Resolution 55/282 where in paragraph3 it states: Ö(UN) Invites all Öregional and non-governmental organizations, individuals, through education and public awarenessÖ to cooperate with the United Nations in establishing of the global ceasefire. Yes, we are invited.
Let us all accept their invitation by promoting our plea for additional 365 days of peace to the existing resolution and with the united voice in action wipe out wars from the face of our Mother Earth for ever.

Marek and Peppe


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