April 27, 2005: Headlines: Figures: Directors - Bellamy: Unicef: United Nations: Bloomberg : Carol Bellamy said in her farewell news conference as head of the United Nations Children's Fund that the world body's employment policies are "mired in the past,'' a problem UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan wants to solve by forcing out many workers

Peace Corps Online: Peace Corps News: Directors of the Peace Corps: Carol Bellamy: January 23, 2005: Index: PCOL Exclusive: Peace Corps Directors - Bellamy : Carol Bellamy and the Peace Corps: April 27, 2005: Headlines: Figures: Directors - Bellamy: Unicef: United Nations: Bloomberg : Carol Bellamy said in her farewell news conference as head of the United Nations Children's Fund that the world body's employment policies are "mired in the past,'' a problem UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan wants to solve by forcing out many workers

By Admin1 (admin) (pool-151-196-181-108.balt.east.verizon.net - 151.196.181.108) on Thursday, April 28, 2005 - 1:25 pm: Edit Post

Carol Bellamy said in her farewell news conference as head of the United Nations Children's Fund that the world body's employment policies are "mired in the past,'' a problem UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan wants to solve by forcing out many workers

Carol Bellamy said in her farewell news conference as head of the United Nations Children's Fund that the world body's employment policies are mired in the past,'' a problem UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan wants to solve by forcing out many workers

Carol Bellamy said in her farewell news conference as head of the United Nations Children's Fund that the world body's employment policies are "mired in the past,'' a problem UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan wants to solve by forcing out many workers

Bellamy Decries UN Bureaucracy `Mired' in Past (Update1)

April 27 (Bloomberg) -- Carol Bellamy said in her farewell news conference as head of the United Nations Children's Fund that the world body's employment policies are ``mired in the past,'' a problem UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan wants to solve by forcing out many workers.

Bellamy, 63, will leave Unicef on April 30 after 10 years as executive director of the agency, which employs more than 10,000 people in 158 nations. She will become chief executive and president of World Learning, a Vermont-based non-profit international education organization.

Former U.S. Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman will succeed Bellamy, beginning May 1.

``The best thing we have is good people out there doing good work,'' Bellamy told reporters at the UN. ``But the human resource policies are still not as flexible and as 21st century as they ought to be. They really need to be improved.''

Bellamy said the combination of UN bureaucracy and politics makes it hard to ``hire and fire, move people around and use the best.'' Bellamy said she used skills honed as a former New York City Council president, New York state senator, Wall Street lawyer and investment banker, to overcome the restrictions.

``Some old New Yorkers remember I was in politics and every once in a while I am stopped on the street and they say what is it like to be out of politics,'' said Bellamy, a Brooklyn Democrat who ran for New York City mayor in 1985. ``I say wait a second, I'm at the UN.''

Staff Buyout

Annan, in a March 21 report to the General Assembly on proposals to improve UN management, suggested a ``one-time staff buyout so as to refresh and realign the staff to meet current needs.'' The UN ``cannot continue to rely on the same pool of people to address all our needs,'' he said.

The General Assembly, consisting of all 191 member governments, will consider authorizing the money needed for the buyout during a September summit of world leaders who will gather to mark the 60th anniversary of the founding of the UN.

As examples of progress under her watch, Bellamy said the death rate of children under 5 has decreased by 16 percent since 1990, and for the first time this year the number of children not attending school dropped below 100 million.

Child Protection

``She took leadership on many of those issues, and in her 10 years we also saw greater attention to child protection issues, as opposed to health, education and survival,'' said Jo Becker, child rights advocate for Human Rights Watch, a Washington-based rights group. ``There is a new priority on the phenomena of child soldiers, child labor and other exploitation issues.''

Becker said that while advocates wish Unicef had pressed the issue even more, the agency was hampered by the quality of its staff and tensions with the U.S. government.

``You have some people who are really remarkable and very forward thinking, and you have a small group that is obstructionist,'' Becker said. ``In the middle you have a lot of people trying to do their jobs but not necessarily making the best contributions.''

Becker said Unicef has been ``constrained'' by social policies of Republican U.S. President George W. Bush, in part because the U.S. provides 15 percent of the agency's budget. Under Bellamy Unicef's budget grew to $1.8 billion in 2004 from $800 million in 1994. The UN and Unicef would like to promote family planning programs to counsel women that the Bush administration opposes.

The agency's future under former Bush official Veneman is in doubt because she lacks background in child issues, Becker said. Bellamy said she isn't concerned because senior Unicef management will remain and the agency's 36-member board has set a long-term ``strategic plan.''

``I fully expect my successor to leave her mark on Unicef, but the general thrust of the work we are doing I believe will continue as it is going on,'' Bellamy said. ``I don't see a major shift in emphasis. You don't bring your government's agenda. You bring Unicef's agenda.''

To contact the reporter of this story:
Bill Varner at the United Nations at wvarner@bloomberg.net

Last Updated: April 27, 2005 16:42 EDT





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April 24, 2005: This Week's Top Stories Date: April 24 2005 No: 576 April 24, 2005: This Week's Top Stories
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April 24, 2005:  Special Events Date: April 24 2005 No: 574 April 24, 2005: Special Events
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RPCVs: Post your stories or press releases here for inclusion next week.

Friends of the Peace Corps 170,000  strong Date: April 2 2005 No: 543 Friends of the Peace Corps 170,000 strong
170,000 is a very special number for the RPCV community - it's the number of Volunteers who have served in the Peace Corps since 1961. It's also a number that is very special to us because March is the first month since our founding in January, 2001 that our readership has exceeded 170,000. And while we know that not everyone who comes to this site is an RPCV, they are all "Friends of the Peace Corps." Thanks everybody for making PCOL your source of news for the Returned Volunteer community.


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Story Source: Bloomberg

This story has been posted in the following forums: : Headlines; Figures; Directors - Bellamy; Unicef; United Nations

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