March 4, 2004 - Sidney Daily News: With more than 10 years of classical vocal training, Costa Rica RPCV Pamela Temple has performed in many venues, from coffeehouses to opera houses

Peace Corps Online: Directory: Costa Rica: Peace Corps Costa Rica : The Peace Corps in Costa Rica: March 4, 2004 - Sidney Daily News: With more than 10 years of classical vocal training, Costa Rica RPCV Pamela Temple has performed in many venues, from coffeehouses to opera houses

By Admin1 (admin) (pool-151-196-13-23.balt.east.verizon.net - 151.196.13.23) on Tuesday, March 09, 2004 - 6:33 pm: Edit Post

With more than 10 years of classical vocal training, Costa Rica RPCV Pamela Temple has performed in many venues, from coffeehouses to opera houses



With more than 10 years of classical vocal training, Costa Rica RPCV Pamela Temple has performed in many venues, from coffeehouses to opera houses

'wild carrot' to bring folk music to Sidney



If you love the pure, non-electric sound of acoustic music, you won't want to miss "wild carrot" when the folk duo appears in concert here on March 13 at 7 p.m.

Presented jointly by Gateway Arts Council and Dorothy Love Retirement Community in the Amos Community Center at Dorothy Love, 3003 W. Cisco Road., the concert is free and open to the public.

The Ohio Arts Council helped to support this program with state tax dollars to encourage economic development, educational excellence and cultural enrichment for all Ohioans.

Pamela Temple and Spencer Funk are the award-winning, Cincinnati-based duo. From 1930s standards to traditional tunes from the 1800s to their own original pieces, perhaps written just last week, their repertoire branches in diverse directions.

Rooted in traditional American music, it includes jazz, blues, traditional folk songs, not-so-traditional folk songs, show tunes and originals. Temple and Funk do arrangements with guitar, mandolin, concertina, penny shistle and bowed psaltery.

"Wild carrot's" entertaining, honest and moving performances have something for everyone, from children to senior citizens, Patricia Speelman, executive director of Gateway Arts Council said. Their growing reputation for high musicianship, professionalism and fun has made them a favorite on the national folk circuit, she added.

Recently chosen as cultural ambassadors to Chile, South America, by the U.S. Embassy in Santiago, they have shared the stage with such internationally known acts as Fairport Convention, Stanley Jordan, Robin and Linda Wiliams, David Massengil, Bill Staines and Bill Morrissey.

They were finalists for the prestigious Kerrville New Folk contest, winners of the Walnut Valley New Songs Showcase for Folk, and were named Best Folk Act by the Cincinnati Entertainment Awards.

With more than 10 years of classical vocal training, Temple has performed in many venues, from coffeehouses to opera houses. Her experience as a Peace Corps volunteer in Costa Rica helped her develop an unique song-writing style.

Funk has always been drawn to finger-style guitar, but has studied and performed many styles including jazz, blues and classical for more than 20 years. He has been in demand as a sideman over the years and teaches guitar, mandolin and bass.

And where did the name "wild carrot" come from? A wild carrot is the same as Queen Anne's lace, the plant often seen in the country blooming with tiny white flowers in large clusters on tall stalks along the roadways. "Wild carrot's" music has been described as being rooted in the solid earth of tradition, while displaying a delicate musical intricacy, like the flower of Queen Anne's lace.

The pair's performance style is interactive and they keep all ages interested, Speelman said.

From swing classics like "Blue Moon" and "Ain't Misbehavin'" to gospel songs, root-toot-tootin' train songs, and sing-alongs, the concert at Dorothy Love will feature "tasteful, creative playing, lovely melodies, and beautiful singing voices, which are the hallmarks of this duo," according to a reviewer with the National Folk Alliance. "As good a straight-ahead folk group as you'll hear."

In the industry newspaper, "Folk Notes," John Krehbiel wrote, "There is a seamless wholeness to wild carrot that goes beyond the ordinary summing of parts and into the realm of special magic..."

And WFPK radio in Louisville, Ky., said, "Pam's beautiful voice and Spenser's tasteful guitar and mandolin work has great appeal for me . . . soothing songs, sweetly sung and simply done."

The Sidney concert gives area audience members the chance to spend a relaxed evening in the Amos Community Center surrounded by music.

For more information about this performance, call the arts council at 498-ARTS.




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Story Source: Sidney Daily News

This story has been posted in the following forums: : Headlines; COS - Costa Rica; Music

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