2008.11.06: November 6, 2008: Headlines: Driehaus: COS - Senegal: Congress: Politics: Cincinnati.Com: Driehaus' win will help solidify the Democrats' majority in the House and ensure Cincinnati a voice in the party that controls Congress

Peace Corps Online: Directory: Senegal: Special Report: Congressman and Senegal RPCV Steve Driehaus: 2008.11.06: November 6, 2008: Headlines: Driehaus: COS - Senegal: Congress: Politics: Cincinnati.Com: Driehaus' win will help solidify the Democrats' majority in the House and ensure Cincinnati a voice in the party that controls Congress

By Admin1 (admin) (151.196.12.195) on Saturday, December 13, 2008 - 12:54 pm: Edit Post

Driehaus' win will help solidify the Democrats' majority in the House and ensure Cincinnati a voice in the party that controls Congress

Driehaus' win will help solidify the Democrats' majority in the House and ensure Cincinnati a voice in the party that controls Congress

Cincinnati has a new lawmaker going to Washington. "Hello, I am Steve Driehaus," a beaming, purple tie-wearing Rep.-elect Driehaus told a crowd of supporters Wednesday. "I am honored to be your next congressman." The Price Hill Democrat gathered with family members and city and county leaders at Mount Echo Park to announce his victory, after a long night of seesaw results that left the outcome uncertain until about 2:30 a.m. By then it was clear: Driehaus beat 14-year incumbent Republican Rep. Steve Chabot 52 percent to 48 percent. With all but two precincts counted, Driehaus had 9,097 more votes. Driehaus, 42, who served as the West Side's state representative for eight years, benefited from strong roots in the 1st Congressional District, where he grew up and attended Elder High School. Like Chabot, he is a fiscal conservative who opposes abortion. Driehaus may also have benefited from the wave of new Democratic voters energized by Obama's campaign. "But he wouldn't have won but for his own great qualifications," Democratic Chairman Tim Burke quickly added. "It was a combination." "Obama's candidacy was clearly important in mobilizing the Democratic base, but at the same time, we had to earn each and every one of those votes," Driehaus said. Senegal RPCV Steve Driehus was elected to Congress in 2008. Driehaus had served in the Ohio House of Representatives since 2001 and has served as Minority Whip since 2005.

Driehaus' win will help solidify the Democrats' majority in the House and ensure Cincinnati a voice in the party that controls Congress

Driehaus' victory links city to majority Dems

By Malia Rulon and Sharon Coolidge mrulon@enquirer.com and scoolidge@enquirer.com

November 6, 2008

Cincinnati has a new lawmaker going to Washington.

"Hello, I am Steve Driehaus," a beaming, purple tie-wearing Rep.-elect Driehaus told a crowd of supporters Wednesday. "I am honored to be your next congressman."

The Price Hill Democrat gathered with family members and city and county leaders at Mount Echo Park to announce his victory, after a long night of seesaw results that left the outcome uncertain until about 2:30 a.m.

By then it was clear: Driehaus beat 14-year incumbent Republican Rep. Steve Chabot 52 percent to 48 percent. With all but two precincts counted, Driehaus had 9,097 more votes.

"It went from 50 percent, the computers aren't working, to - boom - the results are in," said Driehaus, who had remained downtown after his victory party at Sully's restaurant broke up.

His win will help solidify the Democrats' majority in the House and ensure Cincinnati a voice in the party that controls Congress.

Chabot's defeat is a blow to House Republican Leader John Boehner of West Chester, who may face criticism for losing a district that borders his own.

Chabot, who rode the Republican revolution into Congress during the GOP takeover in 1994, was carried out on a Democratic wave that installed a new president and turned House and Senate seats across the country blue for the first time in years.

"Clearly, the Democrats were on the march this year and Barack Obama obviously brought in a lot of Democratic voters who hadn't voted in the past in my district," Chabot said.

He added that voter dissatisfaction with President Bush and the economic crisis likely added to his loss in a district targeted by Democrats every two years.

"The combination finally defeated me," he said.

On Wednesday, Driehaus worked the crowd at his victory news conference the way he had run his campaign - tirelessly. With the American flag waving in the breeze and the Cincinnati skyline as backdrop, Driehaus echoed Obama's theme of change.

"Last night showed we really do want change and we want to see it across the country and here in Cincinnati," Driehaus told the crowd.

Standing shoulder to shoulder with Cincinnati Mayor Mark Mallory, Hamilton County Commissioner Todd Portune and state Rep. Tyrone Yates, among others, Driehaus promised to work with local officials "to make sure that they will have a representative in Congress that's looking out for the interest of Cincinnati, that is looking out for the interest of this region."

"Steve Driehaus understands our priorities well," Mallory said. "This is a huge election as it relates to life in Cincinnati."

Driehaus, 42, who served as the West Side's state representative for eight years, benefited from strong roots in the 1st Congressional District, where he grew up and attended Elder High School. Like Chabot, he is a fiscal conservative who opposes abortion.

Driehaus may also have benefited from the wave of new Democratic voters energized by Obama's campaign.

"But he wouldn't have won but for his own great qualifications," Democratic Chairman Tim Burke quickly added. "It was a combination."

"Obama's candidacy was clearly important in mobilizing the Democratic base, but at the same time, we had to earn each and every one of those votes," Driehaus said.

Chabot said he was unsure what his future would hold. He didn't rule out running again in the 1st District - or for another position.

"I'd like to serve the people again in some manner," he said. "I really do enjoy public service and trying to make a difference in people's lives."

Driehaus' mother, Clare Driehaus, stood back from the crowd at Wednesday's news conference. It was a long night, with two of her children awaiting election results. Denise Driehaus was elected to replace her brother in the legislature.

As she watched her son, the new congressman, she thought of her husband, Don Driehaus, who died last month.

"I feel his spirit here with us," she said.




Links to Related Topics (Tags):

Headlines: November, 2008; RPCV Steve Driehaus (Senegal); Peace Corps Senegal; Directory of Senegal RPCVs; Messages and Announcements for Senegal RPCVs; Congress; Politics; Ohio





When this story was posted in December 2008, this was on the front page of PCOL:




Peace Corps Online The Independent News Forum serving Returned Peace Corps Volunteers RSS Feed

 Site Index Search PCOL with Google Contact PCOL Recent Posts Bulletin Board Open Discussion RPCV Directory Register


Director Ron Tschetter:  The PCOL Interview Date: December 9 2008 No: 1296 Director Ron Tschetter: The PCOL Interview
Peace Corps Director Ron Tschetter sat down for an in-depth interview to discuss the evacuation from Bolivia, political appointees at Peace Corps headquarters, the five year rule, the Peace Corps Foundation, the internet and the Peace Corps, how the transition is going, and what the prospects are for doubling the size of the Peace Corps by 2011. Read the interview and you are sure to learn something new about the Peace Corps. PCOL previously did an interview with Director Gaddi Vasquez.

PCOL's Candidate for Peace Corps Director Date: December 2 2008 No: 1288 PCOL's Candidate for Peace Corps Director
Honduras RPCV Jon Carson, 33, presided over thousands of workers as national field director for the Obama campaign and said the biggest challenge -- and surprise -- was the volume of volunteer help, including more than 15,000 "super volunteers," who were a big part of what made Obama's campaign so successful. PCOL endorses Jon Carson as the man who can revitalize the Peace Corps, bring it into the internet age, and meet Obama's goal of doubling the size of the Peace Corps by 2011.

November 5, 2008: This Month's Top Stories  Date: November 5 2008 No: 1282 November 5, 2008: This Month's Top Stories
World Welcomes Obama Win 5 Nov
Shays Loses Congressional Seat in Connecticut 5 Nov
Steve Driehaus wins Congressional Seat in Ohio 5 Nov
Bill Josephson to speak at UMBC on Nov 13 30 Oct
Peace Corps to Resume Work in Liberia 23 Oct
Tschetter proposes PC Foundation to Further Third Goal 23 Oct
George Packer writes: Roof is falling in on Conservatism 23 Oct
O'Hanlon writes: How to finish the job in Iraq 22 Oct
Mike Paquette writes: Bolivia situation is very troubling 20 Oct
McPherson says bureaucracy delays development initiatives 20 Oct
Philip Razem writes: Reveling in the spirit of politics 19 Oct
Amy Zulman writes: Improving America's Reputation 15 Oct
RPCVs film "Once in Afghanistan" 14 Oct
Some PCVS angry at Peace Corps Bolivia pullout 11 Oct
Hill proposes compromise in Korea talks 11 Oct
Mark Schneider proposes mandatory public service 10 Oct
Ambassador Stephens Visits School after 33 Years Ago 9 Oct
RPCVs promote organic farming with "magic bus" 7 Oct
Obama talks about Doubling the Peace Corps 7 Oct
Conference on Moritz Thomsen held in Quito 5 Oct

New: More Stories from September 2008 and October

Some PCVs return to Bolivia on their own Date: October 23 2008 No: 1279 Some PCVs return to Bolivia on their own
Peace Corps has withdrawn all volunteers from Bolivia because of "growing instability" and the expulsion of US Ambassador Philip Goldberg after Bolivian President Evo Morales accused the American government of inciting violence in the country. This is not the first controversy surrounding Goldberg's tenure as US ambassador to Bolivia. Latest: Some volunteers have returned to Bolivia on their own to complete their projects.

PCVs Evacuated from Georgia Date: August 19 2008 No: 1254 PCVs Evacuated from Georgia
The Peace Corps has announced that all Volunteers and trainees serving in the Republic of Georgia are safe and they have been temporarily relocated to neighboring Armenia. Read the analysis by one RPCV on how Georgia's President Mikheil Saakashvili believed that he could launch a lightning assault on South Ossetia and reclaim the republic without substantial grief from Moscow and that Saakashvili's statements once the war began demonstrated that he expected real Western help in confronting Russia.



Read the stories and leave your comments.








Some postings on Peace Corps Online are provided to the individual members of this group without permission of the copyright owner for the non-profit purposes of criticism, comment, education, scholarship, and research under the "Fair Use" provisions of U.S. Government copyright laws and they may not be distributed further without permission of the copyright owner. Peace Corps Online does not vouch for the accuracy of the content of the postings, which is the sole responsibility of the copyright holder.

Story Source: Cincinnati.Com

This story has been posted in the following forums: : Headlines; Driehaus; COS - Senegal; Congress; Politics

PCOL42404
23


Add a Message


This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Username:  
Password:
E-mail: