2009.03.23: March 23, 2009: Headlines: COS - Uruguay: Law: Wisconsin State Journal: Uruguay RPCV Robert Selk is a volunteer Spanish interpreter for the Dane County Court

Peace Corps Online: Directory: Uruguay: Peace Corps Uruguay : Peace Corps Uruguay: Newest Stories: 2009.03.23: March 23, 2009: Headlines: COS - Uruguay: Law: Wisconsin State Journal: Uruguay RPCV Robert Selk is a volunteer Spanish interpreter for the Dane County Court

By Admin1 (admin) (141.157.16.199) on Thursday, April 09, 2009 - 4:24 pm: Edit Post

Uruguay RPCV Robert Selk is a volunteer Spanish interpreter for the Dane County Court

Uruguay RPCV Robert Selk is a volunteer Spanish interpreter for the Dane County Court

I believe my experience with both our criminal justice system and Latin American systems helps me interpret in a way that minimizes misunderstandings. My goal is to use common legal language Hispanics might recognize from their own legal culture that at the same time accurately conveys what the speaker is attempting to communicate. I believe this approach helps reduce the anxiety of Hispanics when they appear in court. Also, when I interpret in Commissioner Meurerís court, the Dane County interpreter is freed up to work elsewhere and the county has less need to contract additional interpreters.

Uruguay RPCV Robert Selk is a volunteer Spanish interpreter for the Dane County Court

Know Your Madisonian: Robert A. Selk

Name: Robert A. Selk

Hometown: Originally from New Holstein, in Madison since 1978.

Age: 65

Family: Spouse, Christine Selk; son, Andrew Selk.

Occupation: Retired assistant attorney general

Hobbies: Fly fishing and tying fishing flies, foreign travel, cooking, sea kayaking.

What are your volunteer activities? For past five years I have volunteered weekly as a Spanish interpreter before Commissioner Todd Meurer in Dane County Circuit Court. Also, I have been with the Southern Wisconsin Chapter of Trout Unlimited for more than 25 years and currently serve on its executive board. I work on stream restoration projects, fundraising and the Shabazz High School Project Green Teen. I also serve on the Livestock Facility Siting Review Board and have served on various environmental study groups and task forces. Last year, I went to Cuenca, Ecuador, with a medical team and served as interpreter and expect to continue this work in alternate years.

Why is what you do important? I believe my experience with both our criminal justice system and Latin American systems helps me interpret in a way that minimizes misunderstandings. My goal is to use common legal language Hispanics might recognize from their own legal culture that at the same time accurately conveys what the speaker is attempting to communicate. I believe this approach helps reduce the anxiety of Hispanics when they appear in court. Also, when I interpret in Commissioner Meurerís court, the Dane County interpreter is freed up to work elsewhere and the county has less need to contract additional interpreters.

How did you end up in law? After the Peace Corps and graduate school, I began my career as a college teacher. But after a couple of years, I wanted to be more engaged in public life. Law was the answer.

How did you learn to speak Spanish? I minored in Spanish at UW-Oshkosh and also studied Spanish my junior year at the University of Puerto Rico and a summer at the Universidad Veracruzana in Jalapa, Mexico. I received advanced language classes as part of my training to be a Peace Corps volunteer in Uruguay, where I served for two years as an agrarian youth club organizer. I had additional Spanish at Indiana University where I received an M.A. in Latin American Studies.

What was the most rewarding professional experience you had? The most rewarding experience at the Department of Justice was working with Department of Natural Resources technical and enforcement staff to prosecute polluters. I also was very gratified to be able to work from 1995 to 2005 advising governments in Central America on reforming criminal justice and developing the prosecutorial function.

What brought you to Madison? We came to Madison in 1978 for the work opportunities. Having retired we could live anywhere, but we think Madison has everything: a vibrant, open community, excellent health care, the university, Overture, the lakes and great trout fishing.

If you could change anything about Madison what would it be? I would love to see Wisconsin develop an intercity passenger rail system with connections to Chicago and Minneapolis.

ó Interview by Ed Treleven





Links to Related Topics (Tags):

Headlines: March, 2009; Peace Corps Uruguay; Directory of Uruguay RPCVs; Messages and Announcements for Uruguay RPCVs; Law





When this story was posted in April 2009, this was on the front page of PCOL:




Peace Corps Online The Independent News Forum serving Returned Peace Corps Volunteers RSS Feed

 Site Index Search PCOL with Google Contact PCOL Recent Posts Bulletin Board Open Discussion RPCV Directory Register

March 22, 2009: Special Envoy Date: March 22 2009 No: 1343 March 22, 2009: Special Envoy
Holbrooke is Special Envoy to Pakistan and Afghanistan 26 Feb
Peace Corps Madagascar Program Suspended 16 Mar
Peace Corps Volunteer Murdered in Benin 12 Mar
Joseph Acaba Makes First Spacewalk 21 Mar
Michael O'Hanlon: Can Obama win in Afghanistan? 20 Mar
Dodd faces Rebellion in Connecticut 19 Mar
Mike Honda writes: Request for Internet Ideas 19 Mar
Laurence Leamer writes: Tragedy of the Peace Corps 16 Mar
Gaddi Vasquez at Annenberg Foundation Trust 16 Mar
White House defends appointment of Chris Hill 14 Mar
Ted Kennedy promotes national service bill 10 Mar
John Dunlop helps Iraq recover 8 Mar
Want a better safer world? Volunteer. 6 Mar
Guy Consolmagno writes: The Search for Earth-like Planets 5 Mar
Charles Murray to receive AEI Award 5 Mar
Sam Goldman started D.light to replace kerosene lamps 4 Mar
RPCVs apply Ideas To Hometown In Need 3 Mar
Senator Bond: Peace Corps and Smart Power 26 Feb
Bob Shacochis writes: Rebuild the Peace Corps 24 Feb
Stephen Andersen promotes Kenyan artisans 24 Feb
Francis Koster writes: A shard of glass 24 Feb
Read more stories from February 2009 and March.

PCOL's Candidate for Peace Corps Director Date: December 2 2008 No: 1288 PCOL's Candidate for Peace Corps Director
Honduras RPCV Jon Carson, 33, presided over thousands of workers as national field director for the Obama campaign and said the biggest challenge -- and surprise -- was the volume of volunteer help, including more than 15,000 "super volunteers," who were a big part of what made Obama's campaign so successful. PCOL endorses Jon Carson as the man who can revitalize the Peace Corps, bring it into the internet age, and meet Obama's goal of doubling the size of the Peace Corps by 2011.

Director Ron Tschetter:  The PCOL Interview Date: December 9 2008 No: 1296 Director Ron Tschetter: The PCOL Interview
Peace Corps Director Ron Tschetter sat down for an in-depth interview to discuss the evacuation from Bolivia, political appointees at Peace Corps headquarters, the five year rule, the Peace Corps Foundation, the internet and the Peace Corps, how the transition is going, and what the prospects are for doubling the size of the Peace Corps by 2011. Read the interview and you are sure to learn something new about the Peace Corps. PCOL previously did an interview with Director Gaddi Vasquez.



Read the stories and leave your comments.








Some postings on Peace Corps Online are provided to the individual members of this group without permission of the copyright owner for the non-profit purposes of criticism, comment, education, scholarship, and research under the "Fair Use" provisions of U.S. Government copyright laws and they may not be distributed further without permission of the copyright owner. Peace Corps Online does not vouch for the accuracy of the content of the postings, which is the sole responsibility of the copyright holder.

Story Source: Wisconsin State Journal

This story has been posted in the following forums: : Headlines; COS - Uruguay; Law

PCOL43528
40


Add a Message


This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Username:  
Password:
E-mail: