2009.03.31: March 31, 2009: Headlines: COS - Lesotho: Libraries: Fund Raising: Lansing State Journal: Dimondale Elementary School students collected 11 boxes of books for impoverished students in a village in Lesotho meant for a Peace Corps teacher named Casey Bartrem

Peace Corps Online: Directory: Lesotho: Peace Corps Lesotho : Peace Corps Lesotho: Newest Stories: 2009.03.31: March 31, 2009: Headlines: COS - Lesotho: Libraries: Fund Raising: Lansing State Journal: Dimondale Elementary School students collected 11 boxes of books for impoverished students in a village in Lesotho meant for a Peace Corps teacher named Casey Bartrem

By Admin1 (admin) (141.157.16.199) on Thursday, April 09, 2009 - 5:28 pm: Edit Post

Dimondale Elementary School students collected 11 boxes of books for impoverished students in a village in Lesotho meant for a Peace Corps teacher named Casey Bartrem

Dimondale Elementary School students collected 11 boxes of books for impoverished students in a village in Lesotho meant for a Peace Corps teacher named Casey Bartrem

As I wrote on March 20, Sutterlin acknowledged that his lesson, though long on altruism, was a little short on economics. After his students assembled the books - meant for a Peace Corps teacher named Casey Bartrem - Sutterlin learned that shipping them to Africa would cost about $1,100. Suddenly the teacher had a ton of books on his hands, and no way to move them. In deep "I'm in over my head, and outside my pocket book," Sutterlin wrote in an e-mail to me. He was hoping a shipping company might step forward and give him a break. That didn't happen, but within a week or so, readers responding to the column about the Dimondale project came up with an astonishing $1,200. Sutterlin said his phone "rang all day" on the day the column appeared. One anonymous donor kicked in $500, but most of the donations were much smaller. Among the those who e-mailed me about the project was the Peace Corps teacher, herself, who happens to be a native of Williamston. Here's part of what Bartrem wrote: "I'm a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer serving two years here in Lesotho, and when I wrote home to friends and family asking for 'a few books' to add to the new library in my village, I grossly underestimated the response." Sutterlin and Bartrem don't even know each other directly. They have mutual friends. She added: "What the people of Dimondale (and those who contributed to the shipping costs) have done for our village is truly exceptional, and in no way will I be able to thank them adequately. "Thank you to those who have been supportive of my village ... I promise you that my community will never forget the efforts so may have made to bring this to fruition."

Dimondale Elementary School students collected 11 boxes of books for impoverished students in a village in Lesotho meant for a Peace Corps teacher named Casey Bartrem

Schneider: Readers kick in to ship books to African students

John Schneider Lansing State Journal

March 31, 2009 From Lansing State Journal


DIMONDALE - Yeah, money's tight these days, but it seems to have a way of materializing for the right causes.
Advertisement

Helping elementary students with an exercise in good global citizenship, for example.

Dimondale Elementary School students, under the direction of teacher Walt Sutterlin, collected 11 boxes of books for impoverished students in a village in Lesotho, Africa.

As I wrote on March 20, Sutterlin acknowledged that his lesson, though long on altruism, was a little short on economics. After his students assembled the books - meant for a Peace Corps teacher named Casey Bartrem - Sutterlin learned that shipping them to Africa would cost about $1,100.

Suddenly the teacher had a ton of books on his hands, and no way to move them.
In deep

"I'm in over my head, and outside my pocket book," Sutterlin wrote in an e-mail to me.

He was hoping a shipping company might step forward and give him a break.

That didn't happen, but within a week or so, readers responding to the column about the Dimondale project came up with an astonishing $1,200.

Sutterlin said his phone "rang all day" on the day the column appeared.

One anonymous donor kicked in $500, but most of the donations were much smaller.

Among the those who e-mailed me about the project was the Peace Corps teacher, herself, who happens to be a native of Williamston. Here's part of what Bartrem wrote:

"I'm a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer serving two years here in Lesotho, and when I wrote home to friends and family asking for 'a few books' to add to the new library in my village, I grossly underestimated the response."

Sutterlin and Bartrem don't even know each other directly. They have mutual friends.
'Truly exceptional'

She added: "What the people of Dimondale (and those who contributed to the shipping costs) have done for our village is truly exceptional, and in no way will I be able to thank them adequately.

"Thank you to those who have been supportive of my village ... I promise you that my community will never forget the efforts so may have made to bring this to fruition."

Meanwhile, back in the classroom, the project has spawned a whole school year's worth of lessons.

Said Sutterlin: "It's been a huge lesson in character education ... global citizenship ... the power of the press ... the ability to reach out, and make a difference in the world."

Sutterlin said he'll use the surplus donations to send more books to Lesotho.

Call John Schneider at 377-1175, send a fax to 377-1298 or e-mail jschneid@lsj.com.




Links to Related Topics (Tags):

Headlines: March, 2009; Peace Corps Lesotho; Directory of Lesotho RPCVs; Messages and Announcements for Lesotho RPCVs; Libraries; Fund Raising





When this story was posted in April 2009, this was on the front page of PCOL:




Peace Corps Online The Independent News Forum serving Returned Peace Corps Volunteers RSS Feed

 Site Index Search PCOL with Google Contact PCOL Recent Posts Bulletin Board Open Discussion RPCV Directory Register

March 22, 2009: Special Envoy Date: March 22 2009 No: 1343 March 22, 2009: Special Envoy
Holbrooke is Special Envoy to Pakistan and Afghanistan 26 Feb
Peace Corps Madagascar Program Suspended 16 Mar
Peace Corps Volunteer Murdered in Benin 12 Mar
Joseph Acaba Makes First Spacewalk 21 Mar
Michael O'Hanlon: Can Obama win in Afghanistan? 20 Mar
Dodd faces Rebellion in Connecticut 19 Mar
Mike Honda writes: Request for Internet Ideas 19 Mar
Laurence Leamer writes: Tragedy of the Peace Corps 16 Mar
Gaddi Vasquez at Annenberg Foundation Trust 16 Mar
White House defends appointment of Chris Hill 14 Mar
Ted Kennedy promotes national service bill 10 Mar
John Dunlop helps Iraq recover 8 Mar
Want a better safer world? Volunteer. 6 Mar
Guy Consolmagno writes: The Search for Earth-like Planets 5 Mar
Charles Murray to receive AEI Award 5 Mar
Sam Goldman started D.light to replace kerosene lamps 4 Mar
RPCVs apply Ideas To Hometown In Need 3 Mar
Senator Bond: Peace Corps and Smart Power 26 Feb
Bob Shacochis writes: Rebuild the Peace Corps 24 Feb
Stephen Andersen promotes Kenyan artisans 24 Feb
Francis Koster writes: A shard of glass 24 Feb
Read more stories from February 2009 and March.

PCOL's Candidate for Peace Corps Director Date: December 2 2008 No: 1288 PCOL's Candidate for Peace Corps Director
Honduras RPCV Jon Carson, 33, presided over thousands of workers as national field director for the Obama campaign and said the biggest challenge -- and surprise -- was the volume of volunteer help, including more than 15,000 "super volunteers," who were a big part of what made Obama's campaign so successful. PCOL endorses Jon Carson as the man who can revitalize the Peace Corps, bring it into the internet age, and meet Obama's goal of doubling the size of the Peace Corps by 2011.

Director Ron Tschetter:  The PCOL Interview Date: December 9 2008 No: 1296 Director Ron Tschetter: The PCOL Interview
Peace Corps Director Ron Tschetter sat down for an in-depth interview to discuss the evacuation from Bolivia, political appointees at Peace Corps headquarters, the five year rule, the Peace Corps Foundation, the internet and the Peace Corps, how the transition is going, and what the prospects are for doubling the size of the Peace Corps by 2011. Read the interview and you are sure to learn something new about the Peace Corps. PCOL previously did an interview with Director Gaddi Vasquez.



Read the stories and leave your comments.








Some postings on Peace Corps Online are provided to the individual members of this group without permission of the copyright owner for the non-profit purposes of criticism, comment, education, scholarship, and research under the "Fair Use" provisions of U.S. Government copyright laws and they may not be distributed further without permission of the copyright owner. Peace Corps Online does not vouch for the accuracy of the content of the postings, which is the sole responsibility of the copyright holder.

Story Source: Lansing State Journal

This story has been posted in the following forums: : Headlines; COS - Lesotho; Libraries; Fund Raising

PCOL43568
60


Add a Message


This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Username:  
Password:
E-mail: