2008.12.06: December 6, 2008: Headlines: Military: Fathers: Houston Chronicle: Air Force Gen. Victor E. Renuart Jr.wo sons. One has been in combat and the other in the Peace Corps

Peace Corps Online: Peace Corps News: Library: Peace Corps: Fathers: Peace Corps: Fathers: Newest Stories: 2008.12.06: December 6, 2008: Headlines: Military: Fathers: Houston Chronicle: Air Force Gen. Victor E. Renuart Jr.wo sons. One has been in combat and the other in the Peace Corps

By Admin1 (admin) (151.196.12.195) on Saturday, December 13, 2008 - 11:38 am: Edit Post

Air Force General Victor E. Renuart Jr. is the proud father of two great sons. One has been in combat and the other in the Peace Corps.

Air Force General Victor E. Renuart Jr. is the proud father of two great sons. One has been in combat and the other in the Peace Corps.

["I'm the] proud dad of two great young men. The oldest son had three combat tours, also served as a contractor in Iraq assisting the Army. The other son is in his third year of medical school. He also is a great, save-the-world young guy, and he will go out and make a contribution as a physician here in the future. We are really proud of both of them. Very different paths, very different political views on the part of both of them. We sometimes try to figure out where the gene pool came from that created them. But both are very focused on service, service to the country, service to the world. From a military family, that is a pretty neat thing to see."

Air Force General Victor E. Renuart Jr. is the proud father of two great sons. One has been in combat and the other in the Peace Corps.

Nation faces numerous threats, general says

By DANE SCHILLER Copyright 2008
Houston Chronicle

Dec. 6, 2008, 10:31PM

Gen. Victor E. Renuart Jr., who joined the military in 1972, says today's enemies don't follow the rules and operate in the shadows.

Air Force Gen. Victor E. Renuart Jr. commander of the North American Aerospace Defense Command, more commonly known as NORAD was in Houston last week to speak at the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy. He spent a few minutes talking with Houston Chronicle reporter Dane Schiller about the threat facing the nation and other matters. Here is a portion of their conversation.

Q: For the average person, when they hear NORAD, they think back to the Cold War days when the Soviets had bombers and submarines with nuclear missiles. The common perception is that this no longer is the imminent threat. How have things changed?

A: We have changed the mission over time fairly substantially. After 9/11, you have to pay attention inside our country as much as we do outside our country. We saw the use of a civilian aircraft by terrorist groups become a weapon of mass destruction.

Q: If someone were to ask you, 'What does our enemy look like now?' what would you tell them?

A: The threats we now see are varied. We have to be cognizant that a nation-state may challenge us, a Russia or China or some other large competitor.

But I think more in the near term, we have a threat that is very agile, that operates in shadows and doesn't follow the rules: They are terrorist organizations; they are rogue nations who choose to buck the rest of the world community. So we have to open our horizons a bit as we look at where threats may reside they may reside in cyber, they may reside in the maritime shipping industry, that sort of thing.

Q: When you talk about cyber, are you talking about a threat to knock out our Internet, knock out our ATMs?

A: Certainly. We have seen (that) in the country of Estonia, where Russian hackers literally brought the country to a standstill. Banking, yes, ATMs, certainly the transportation system, the power-generation system, all of that was affected by that attack in Estonia. We have to be aware that the same thing could happen. We also have hackers every day that are trying to get into our information systems in the Department of Defense.

Q: Shifting to other matters, you have two sons. One has been in combat and the other in the Peace Corps. That is quite a difference. What do you make of that?

A: Proud dad of two great young men. The oldest son had three combat tours, also served as a contractor in Iraq assisting the Army.

Q: And your other son?

A: The other son is in his third year of medical school. He also is a great, save-the-world young guy, and he will go out and make a contribution as a physician here in the future. We are really proud of both of them.

Very different paths, very different political views on the part of both of them. We sometimes try to figure out where the gene pool came from that created them. But both are very focused on service, service to the country, service to the world. From a military family, that is a pretty neat thing to see.

Q: A civilian would see you (in uniform) and say, 'My gosh, how many medals and ribbons do you have?' How many do you have?

A: I have 28, I think.

Q: Which one are you most proud of?

A: I think the air medals for my combat time. I was a commander of an A-10 squadron during the first Gulf War. The opportunity for a fighter pilot to lead a squadron in combat is something you always aspire to.

Q: You joined the military in 1972. How long do you think you will stay?

A: I was commissioned in 1972. My current job will continue through March 2010, and I serve at the pleasure of the secretary and the president, so we will see where that goes.

dane.schiller@chron.com




Links to Related Topics (Tags):

Headlines: December, 2008; Military; Fathers





When this story was posted in December 2008, this was on the front page of PCOL:




Peace Corps Online The Independent News Forum serving Returned Peace Corps Volunteers RSS Feed

 Site Index Search PCOL with Google Contact PCOL Recent Posts Bulletin Board Open Discussion RPCV Directory Register


Director Ron Tschetter:  The PCOL Interview Date: December 9 2008 No: 1296 Director Ron Tschetter: The PCOL Interview
Peace Corps Director Ron Tschetter sat down for an in-depth interview to discuss the evacuation from Bolivia, political appointees at Peace Corps headquarters, the five year rule, the Peace Corps Foundation, the internet and the Peace Corps, how the transition is going, and what the prospects are for doubling the size of the Peace Corps by 2011. Read the interview and you are sure to learn something new about the Peace Corps. PCOL previously did an interview with Director Gaddi Vasquez.

PCOL's Candidate for Peace Corps Director Date: December 2 2008 No: 1288 PCOL's Candidate for Peace Corps Director
Honduras RPCV Jon Carson, 33, presided over thousands of workers as national field director for the Obama campaign and said the biggest challenge -- and surprise -- was the volume of volunteer help, including more than 15,000 "super volunteers," who were a big part of what made Obama's campaign so successful. PCOL endorses Jon Carson as the man who can revitalize the Peace Corps, bring it into the internet age, and meet Obama's goal of doubling the size of the Peace Corps by 2011.

November 5, 2008: This Month's Top Stories  Date: November 5 2008 No: 1282 November 5, 2008: This Month's Top Stories
World Welcomes Obama Win 5 Nov
Shays Loses Congressional Seat in Connecticut 5 Nov
Steve Driehaus wins Congressional Seat in Ohio 5 Nov
Bill Josephson to speak at UMBC on Nov 13 30 Oct
Peace Corps to Resume Work in Liberia 23 Oct
Tschetter proposes PC Foundation to Further Third Goal 23 Oct
George Packer writes: Roof is falling in on Conservatism 23 Oct
O'Hanlon writes: How to finish the job in Iraq 22 Oct
Mike Paquette writes: Bolivia situation is very troubling 20 Oct
McPherson says bureaucracy delays development initiatives 20 Oct
Philip Razem writes: Reveling in the spirit of politics 19 Oct
Amy Zulman writes: Improving America's Reputation 15 Oct
RPCVs film "Once in Afghanistan" 14 Oct
Some PCVS angry at Peace Corps Bolivia pullout 11 Oct
Hill proposes compromise in Korea talks 11 Oct
Mark Schneider proposes mandatory public service 10 Oct
Ambassador Stephens Visits School after 33 Years Ago 9 Oct
RPCVs promote organic farming with "magic bus" 7 Oct
Obama talks about Doubling the Peace Corps 7 Oct
Conference on Moritz Thomsen held in Quito 5 Oct

New: More Stories from September 2008 and October

Some PCVs return to Bolivia on their own Date: October 23 2008 No: 1279 Some PCVs return to Bolivia on their own
Peace Corps has withdrawn all volunteers from Bolivia because of "growing instability" and the expulsion of US Ambassador Philip Goldberg after Bolivian President Evo Morales accused the American government of inciting violence in the country. This is not the first controversy surrounding Goldberg's tenure as US ambassador to Bolivia. Latest: Some volunteers have returned to Bolivia on their own to complete their projects.

PCVs Evacuated from Georgia Date: August 19 2008 No: 1254 PCVs Evacuated from Georgia
The Peace Corps has announced that all Volunteers and trainees serving in the Republic of Georgia are safe and they have been temporarily relocated to neighboring Armenia. Read the analysis by one RPCV on how Georgia's President Mikheil Saakashvili believed that he could launch a lightning assault on South Ossetia and reclaim the republic without substantial grief from Moscow and that Saakashvili's statements once the war began demonstrated that he expected real Western help in confronting Russia.



Read the stories and leave your comments.








Some postings on Peace Corps Online are provided to the individual members of this group without permission of the copyright owner for the non-profit purposes of criticism, comment, education, scholarship, and research under the "Fair Use" provisions of U.S. Government copyright laws and they may not be distributed further without permission of the copyright owner. Peace Corps Online does not vouch for the accuracy of the content of the postings, which is the sole responsibility of the copyright holder.

Story Source: Houston Chronicle

This story has been posted in the following forums: : Headlines; Military; Fathers

PCOL42563
17


Add a Message


This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Username:  
Password:
E-mail: