December 10, 2004: Headlines: COS - Bangladesh: Art: Painting: NYFA: Since earning her MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago four years ago, Bangladesh RPCV Dannielle Tegeder has signed with Chicagoís Jan Cicero Gallery, been featured in three solo shows, and won both The Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation Studio Grant and the Bronx Museumís Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) grant

Peace Corps Online: Directory: Bangladesh: Peace Corps Bangladesh : The Peace Corps in Bangladesh: December 10, 2004: Headlines: COS - Bangladesh: Art: Painting: NYFA: Since earning her MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago four years ago, Bangladesh RPCV Dannielle Tegeder has signed with Chicagoís Jan Cicero Gallery, been featured in three solo shows, and won both The Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation Studio Grant and the Bronx Museumís Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) grant

By Admin1 (admin) (pool-151-196-43-253.balt.east.verizon.net - 151.196.43.253) on Saturday, January 01, 2005 - 7:50 pm: Edit Post

Since earning her MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago four years ago, Bangladesh RPCV Dannielle Tegeder has signed with Chicagoís Jan Cicero Gallery, been featured in three solo shows, and won both The Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation Studio Grant and the Bronx Museumís Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) grant

 Since earning her MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago four years ago, Bangladesh RPCV Dannielle Tegeder has signed with Chicagoís Jan Cicero Gallery, been featured in three solo shows, and won both The Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation Studio Grant and the Bronx Museumís Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) grant

Since earning her MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago four years ago, Bangladesh RPCV Dannielle Tegeder has signed with Chicagoís Jan Cicero Gallery, been featured in three solo shows, and won both The Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation Studio Grant and the Bronx Museumís Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) grant

Dannielle Tegeder

Since earning her MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago four years ago, Dannielle Tegeder has signed with Chicagoís Jan Cicero Gallery, been featured in three solo shows, and won both The Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation Studio Grant and the Bronx Museumís Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) grant. Tegederís work, which delves inside the human body and under the city streets, will be appearing at New Yorkís New Museum in the fall of 2002. Tegeder received her BFA from SUNY Purchase; she currently resides in New York City.

The interview was conducted by Ilana Stanger of TheArtBiz.com.

Youíve pointed to ďastronomical charts, 18th century Dutch floral paintings, Indian miniature paintings, and medical and botanical illustrationsĒ as inspiration for your work. Do you spend time in libraries searching for these images, or do they find you?

I do a lot of research on the Internet. Lately, Iíve been looking at mostly architectural stuff--Iíve become interested in underground plans and mapping systems, and the way information is moved along underground systems.

Your previous work explored the cells and organs inside the human body. What interests you about these hidden worlds? Why did you shift from depicting systems inside the body to under the city?

Iíve always been interested in microsystems and the way miniature systems are connected, whether organic or mechanical--I even have a microscope. My life changed since moving from Chicago to New York. Being on the subway, and just looking at all the lights each night, has definitely affected my work.

There is tons of color in your painting...

Color is really important to me. After college I was in the Peace Corps in West Africa and I also spent a year in India. I was really struck by color combinations you just wouldnít see in the West. People wore orange, green, turquoiseó-all at once. My colors are influenced by those experiences, as well as by pop culture: candy packaging, gap sweaters.

Do you think about color in terms of the sale ability of your work?

I donít, and I try not to. I have a lot of big drawings on paper, which are hard to sell. Everything is so expensive-óframes are $600 for each of those pieces. I donít pay for frames, but Iím young and beginning and my gallery had to foot a lot of money just to frame two pieces. I try not to think about what sells, on purpose, but this is my business. This year I began to set aside eight to ten hours a week for business-ótax forms, sending out slides, calling people who are interested in my work and arranging studio visits. I was never taught about any of this in art school, which is a huge problem.

How did you get the Marie Walsh Sharpe Art Foundation Space Program?

Iíve known about this grant for a while. I have set grants I apply for each year, and this was one of them. Last year I decided to apply for everything. A friend and I each sent out thirty slide packets. I had so many rejection letters...meanwhile, my friend was becoming famous. I applied for this grant twice before, which shows that itís just really worth applying. Each panel is different, and panels change. After this I will be in the AIM program at the Bronx Museum, which I applied to three times before getting.

You have a BFA from SUNY Purchase and an MFA from the Art Institute of Chicago. Iím always impressed by what I perceive as the confidence necessary to enter an art program at 18. When did you decide to study painting?

It does take confidence. I didnít have it right offó-I did one year at the College of New Rochelle first. My mother kept saying, Ďbut you wanted to study art.í I dreamed of going to the Art Institute of Chicago. I reapplied twice there too, but in the end I got in and loved it.

Did your MFA program meet your expectations?

It was the best place in the world. I loved graduate school. My work though, was at its worst, which is funny to think back on. Graduate school destroyed my work. There were so many influences and critiques, and I wasnít sure of myself. I was intimidated, and it kind of ruined it. India cured me. The day after finishing my MFA I went to India. Traveling there made me realize why I do art. Itís not about a gallery. If you depend on success youíll never be satisfied, because thereís always another level.

Will you stay in New York after your grant expires?

Yes.

Do you notice a difference between the NY and the Chicago artist scene?

Itís so different. Chicago is great for a young artist. I was able to live in a huge loft, teach, and paint a lot. I made a lot of work. Here itís very expensive, so itís been a real trick. You can go to openings every night---the magnitude of work you can see is amazing. Iíve been exposed to a lot of things, a lot of role models. In Chicago there arenít that many artists supporting themselves on their work.

How did you end up with your Chicago gallery?

I went in to this gallery and...all the planets must have been in alignment. Iíve never done this before, and I would not recommend it, but I just thought that my work would fit in with the gallery, and I had my slides on me, so I went up to this young guy at the desk and said, ĎIím a painterí and asked if I could show him my slides. He looked and said, ĎYou know what? I love them.í Within five days I had a gallery. Before that Iíd felt like Iíd been in every gallery in Chicago and been rejected by each. Again, itís all about persistence.

Has having gallery representation changed your art?

Yes. I worked alone for years. I had no shows to work for, and now I have two. I have one in November and one in December, and I need to think about who is gonna get what, and what my schedule is. I never had to worry about that before because no one ever saw my work. Having deadlines makes you work. Now I have a sign-up sheet beside the studio dooró-I sign-in and out to keep track of my hours.

You also sell work with Paintings Direct.com. Why did you decide to sell work on the Internet?

I think the Internet is really exciting and interesting. Itís been a great PR tool, because people across the country can see it. I looked at a lot of Internet sites and applied to that one, and I love my page. I keep the work that I sell there separate from the galleries.

What will you do in August when your grant expires?

I love teaching, and Iíll be teaching at SUNY Purchase in the fall. If I could choose I would teach two to three classes and spend the rest of my time in the studio.

Sometimes I definitely have Ďwhat am I doingí days. Before this grant I was living in Chicago and teaching at the University of Illinois. I had a full salary, benefits, stock options, a good apartment, and a relationshipÖ. I gave that up. But this has always been my dream. I got a lot back, and I had to take a leap. On my first day here they had an open studio. I had some half-finished paintingsó-I had just arrived-óbut I put them up and opened my door. The director of the New Museum came in and put me into a group show right then. Iíd made such a huge transition, and that was like a sign saying Iíd made the right choice.

What would you tell emerging artists?

Go out and look at a lot of work. Go to openings, galleries. I didnít have a lot of role models-ómy family members are not artists or scholars and I was told you couldnít be successful. Itís been important to find people doing it.

Get good slides. It took me a long time to get that together. Your slides are what go out-ónot you, your studio, or the way your work really looks. Itís a huge expense and commitment, but getting professional slides is the best thing I ever did.

The main thing is to paint. Artists alone stop making work, and since school I have been alone a lot. I started a critique group that met every month, which kept me working for the first two years. Your work has to be seen, itís part of the cycle.

It sounds simple but there are so many distractions. You need a schedule. A friend of mine had a lot of shows, and I had none. I was kind of painting, and I was kind of pissed. She told me to plan an imaginary show. I did itó-I scheduled a date for a solo show and made up a gallery name and put it on my calendar. I planned out the entire gallery space and created pieces for it. It workedó-I got my show.

This article was originally created for TheArtBiz.com. It appears on NYFA Interactive courtesy of the Abigail Rebecca Cohen Library.





When this story was posted in December 2004, this was on the front page of PCOL:

Our debt to Bill Moyers Our debt to Bill Moyers
Former Peace Corps Deputy Director Bill Moyers leaves PBS next week to begin writing his memoir of Lyndon Baines Johnson. Read what Moyers says about journalism under fire, the value of a free press, and the yearning for democracy. "We have got to nurture the spirit of independent journalism in this country," he warns, "or we'll not save capitalism from its own excesses, and we'll not save democracy from its own inertia."

December 10, 2004: This Week's Top Stories December 10, 2004: This Week's Top Stories
Dodd says Rumsfeld's answer was unacceptable 9 Dec
RPCV Blake Willeford runs classic movie theatre 9 Dec
RPCV says education is key to curbing AIDS 9 Dec
RPCV Dannielle Tegeder opens exhibition 9 Dec
Shalala 1st Woman In Touchdown Club 9 Dec
"Today we have a new country" says Toledo 9 Dec
DDN wins Investigative Reporting Award 8 Dec
Celeste on Panel to study Colorado finances 8 Dec
RPCV leads Rotary Club medical team to Togo 6 Dec
Vasquez to speak at Hawaii, Wisconsin commencements 6 Dec
Tom Murphy warns Pittsburgh on budget abyss 2 Dec
Venezuela RPCV Martha Egan runs Pachamama imports 30 Nov
more top stories...

RPCV safe after Terrorist Attack RPCV safe after Terrorist Attack
RPCV Gina Abercrombie-Winstanley, the U.S. consul general in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia survived Monday's attack on the consulate without injury. Five consular employees and four others were killed. Abercrombie-Winstanley, the first woman to hold the position, has been an outspoken advocate of rights for Arab women and has met with Saudi reformers despite efforts by Saudi leaders to block the discussions.
Is Gaddi Leaving? Is Gaddi Leaving?
Rumors are swirling that Peace Corps Director Vasquez may be leaving the administration. We think Director Vasquez has been doing a good job and if he decides to stay to the end of the administration, he could possibly have the same sort of impact as a Loret Ruppe Miller. If Vasquez has decided to leave, then Bob Taft, Peter McPherson, Chris Shays, or Jody Olsen would be good candidates to run the agency. Latest: For the record, Peace Corps has no comment on the rumors.
The Birth of the Peace Corps The Birth of the Peace Corps
UMBC's Shriver Center and the Maryland Returned Volunteers hosted Scott Stossel, biographer of Sargent Shriver, who spoke on the Birth of the Peace Corps. This is the second annual Peace Corps History series - last year's speaker was Peace Corps Director Jack Vaughn.
Vote "Yes" on NPCA's bylaw changes Vote "Yes" on NPCA's bylaw changes
Take our new poll. NPCA members begin voting this week on bylaw changes to streamline NPCA's Board of Directors. NPCA Chair Ken Hill, the President's Forum and other RPCVs endorse the changes. Mail in your ballot or vote online (after Dec 1), then see on how RPCVs are voting.
Charges possible in 1976 PCV slaying Charges possible in 1976 PCV slaying
Congressman Norm Dicks has asked the U.S. attorney in Seattle to consider pursuing charges against Dennis Priven, the man accused of killing Peace Corps Volunteer Deborah Gardner on the South Pacific island of Tonga 28 years ago. Background on this story here and here.
Your vote makes a difference Your vote makes a difference
Make a difference on November 2 - Vote. Then take our RPCV exit poll. See how RPCV's are voting and take a look at the RPCV voter demographic. Finally leave a message on why you voted for John Kerry or for George Bush. Previous poll results here.

Read the stories and leave your comments.






Some postings on Peace Corps Online are provided to the individual members of this group without permission of the copyright owner for the non-profit purposes of criticism, comment, education, scholarship, and research under the "Fair Use" provisions of U.S. Government copyright laws and they may not be distributed further without permission of the copyright owner. Peace Corps Online does not vouch for the accuracy of the content of the postings, which is the sole responsibility of the copyright holder.

Story Source: NYFA

This story has been posted in the following forums: : Headlines; COS - Bangladesh; Art; Painting

PCOL15321
87

.


Add a Message


This is a public posting area. Enter your username and password if you have an account. Otherwise, enter your full name as your username and leave the password blank. Your e-mail address is optional.
Username:  
Password:
E-mail: